Icelandic

 

Quick Facts :

  • Country of Origin: Iceland
  • Average Height 12.2-14.2hh
  • Average Weight 730-840 lbs

Five Gaits: Walk, Trot, Tölt, Canter, and Flying Pace

If you haven't felt the unique feel of the tölt, please put this on your horse riding bucket list. The first reaction is glee, followed by laughter, then exhilaration as this tiny little power house of a horse will take you on a ride of a lifetime. The tölt is a very smooth, four-beat gait. Some Icelandic's also perform a flying pace (skeið.) a two-beat lateral gait. The flying pace can reach up to 30 mph!

The Original Viking Horse!

The Icelandic Horse arrived in Iceland with the Vikings over 1,000 years ago. In the year 930 the importation of other horses was prohibited, making the current Icelandic horse one of the purest in the world. They are known for being strong, sturdy, and capable of carrying adult riders over long distances!

Only Breed Allowed in Iceland

Once a horse leaves Iceland, the law prevents them from returning home, and to this day there are no horses allowed to be imported.

Tough, Surefooted, Fluffy, and Loveable!

These well built little horses are known for having solid hooves, strong bones, and exceptional personalities. They are often ridden in areas that wouldn’t be safe for other horses, and on rides in Iceland, your guide will often tell you, “Just let the horse pick its own path, they know what they are doing.” They develop thick furry coats in the winter, which not only makes them look like large teddy bears, it makes them very comfortable in tough weather conditions.

The Coat of Many Colors

A unique characteristic of these viking horses are their wide variety of colors and patterns. Over 100 different colors and patterns are recognized including: Móálóttur (Silver-gray with black points,) Leirljós (Very light, with lighter mane and tail,) and unusual shades of roan.

Long Healthy Lives

Training is usually started at around 4-5 years of age allowing the bones time to fully mature. They have a long life span and it is common to see owners still riding their horses well into their 20’s. A mare from Denmark, named Tulle was reported to have lived to 56 years old!

The Horse For Everyone

A true gem in the horse world. These little horses are known for being safe, dependable confidence builders for the beginner riders and yet it only takes one ride on a little Ferrari for an experienced rider to fall in love! They are popular as:

  • Trail Horses
  • Endurance Riding
  • Dressage
  • Jumping
  • Icelandic Breed Shows
  • Beer Tolt!
 

Featured Horse:

Hrapi fra Curtis

  • Registered Icelandic Gelding
  • Born in 2003
  • 12.3hh
  • Four Gaited
  • Owned by Alyssa Mathews
  • Lives in Colorado, USA.
  • Sired by Faldur Fra Toftum

Learn More:

The United States Icelandic Horse Congress maintains the Registry of Icelandic Horses in the U.S, sponsors U.S. participation in international competitions, and regulates breeding and competition activities within the U.S. in accordance with FEIF rules. It furthers knowledge of the Icelandic Horse within the U.S., promotes its correct use as a competition and pleasure riding horse, and provides a network in which to share information on events and services among Icelandic Horse owners. Prospective owners should first read our buyer's checklist.

www.Icelandics.org

The goal of the Klettafjalla Icelandic Horse Club (KIHC) is to promote the Icelandic horse, to educate its membership about the breed, and to provide opportunities and activities as well as an environment of support for owners and riders who enjoy the talents and characteristics of the Icelandic horse throughout the Rocky Mountains.

www.Klettafjalla.com

It was our hope to form an organization that would be an ideal way to connect with other Icelandic Horse owners in the Midwest to support each other and enjoy this wonderful breed of horse to its fullest capacity, while still keeping our mission statement in mind.That is “To preserve the uniqueness and integrity of the Icelandic Horse”.

www.Flugnir.org

Information From:

United States Icelandic Horse Congress ( www.Icelandics.org)